Quantum Supremacy: How the Quantum Computer Revolution Will Change Everything by Michio Kaku

Brief Summary Book Of Quantum Supremacy: How the Quantum Computer Revolution Will Change Everything by Michio Kaku

The soaring triumph of the microchip processor might be approaching its limits. As we encounter the confines imposed by diminishing sizes, conventional silicon chips are unlikely to offer solutions to the monumental challenges confronting humanity—from battling climate change to tackling global hunger and grappling with untreatable illnesses. However, the quantum computer, a technology that harnesses the intricate power of the atomic realm, stands poised to be as transformative as the transistor and microchip once were. Its exceptional surge in computational prowess heralds breakthroughs that could potentially reshape every facet of our daily existence.

Leaders in the automotive industry, medical research, and consulting spheres are placing their bets on quantum computing, envisioning its potential to design more resource-efficient vehicles, innovate life-saving medications, and overhaul industries to fundamentally revolutionize the economy. Yet, this merely scratches the surface. Quantum computers could unlock the door to creating nuclear fusion reactors that generate clean, renewable energy without generating radioactive waste or meltdowns. They might decode the enigma of biological processes that yield natural and cost-effective fertilizers, thus providing sustenance for our planet’s burgeoning population. Additionally, they could decipher the intricate puzzle of protein folding—the underlying challenge of previously incurable ailments such as Alzheimer’s, ALS, and Parkinson’s—ushering in the promise of longer, healthier lives. The breadth of challenges that quantum computing could address is limitless.

Presented with Dr. Michio Kaku’s signature clarity and boundless enthusiasm, “Quantum Supremacy” narrates the saga of this enthralling frontier and the competitive race to shape the destiny of humanity.

Review book of Quantum Supremacy: How the Quantum Computer Revolution Will Change Everything by Michio Kaku

Kaku introduces the reader to a broad understanding of quantum computing, its potential implementations, and their implications. However, the book falls short of delving into the practical details of problem-solving due to the intricate mathematical expertise required to grasp quantum computing effectively. Instead, the focus primarily revolves around various unresolved challenges that quantum computers might address in the future. While the exploration is captivating from a general scientific and futuristic standpoint, it often strays from being a comprehensive discourse on quantum computing itself.

In discussing potential applications, Kaku frequently asserts that quantum computers will contribute to solving problems without providing clear explanations of the mechanisms and rationale behind these claims. The intricacies of programming a quantum computer are left unexplored, with recommended reading materials filling that void:

– *Dancing with Qubits: How Quantum Computing Works and How It Can Change the World*
– *Quantum Computing for Everyone*

Nonetheless, digital computers remain in constant evolution. The historical case of Bubble memory serves as a reminder that overhyped technology sometimes succumbs to steady advancements in more established technologies. For quantum computers to achieve and maintain supremacy over classical computers, they must outpace a continuously progressing target.

It’s worth noting that not every novel idea translates to success. A multitude of efforts might yield a single working solution, making Bill Gates’ adage relevant: for one successful idea, you might need to invest in around a hundred new concepts. The realm of technology is rife with hype. The trajectory of Artificial Intelligence (AI) exemplifies this pattern, oscillating between being on the brink of global dominance and entering periods of dormancy, as acknowledged by Kaku. AI’s progression has been incremental, showcasing prowess in games like chess and Go! while marginally benefiting Amazon’s profits through product recommendations. However, the elusive technology capable of rendering comprehensive assistance akin to a personal team of experts for the average individual remains beyond reach. Challenges that demand human intelligence persist, but the cost of human intellect prohibits addressing most of these obstacles.

While Kaku provides an intriguing overview of unresolved problems, instances arise where he appears to underestimate the reader’s intelligence. For example:

“Microsoft is one company that cannot wait to solve the nitrogen-fixing problem. It already is using first-generation quantum computers to see if the mystery of this process can be uncovered. The implications are profound, with the potential to create a Second Green Revolution and feed an exploding world population with lower energy costs. Failure to do so could have disastrous side effects, as we’ve seen, perhaps leading to riots, famine, and wars.”

However, Kaku seems to overlook the potential adverse consequences of success, such as enabling further population expansion until encountering the next limitation. The continuous growth on a finite planet or universe ultimately foretells doom, either in the distant or near future. Quantum computing might assist in developing remedies for genetic disorders, but without addressing human psychology and behavior, progress is limited.

Kaku also occasionally employs metonymy, as seen when he references improving solar cells as “solving” climate change. While solar energy can contribute to resolving climate change, it’s only one component in a larger solution. Altering human psychology remains paramount—changing what individuals know and desire. Quantum computing might contribute to this transformation, akin to its role in curing genetic disorders.

While Kaku’s survey of unresolved problems is captivating, he occasionally fails to consider the broader implications. This is illustrated when he refers to harnessing quantum computers to model battery chemistry with lab-like precision, sidestepping the fact that laboratory testing can also be automated. With advancements in laboratory automation, quantum computers might face a dynamic target, where laboratory tests become less cumbersome.

Furthermore, Kaku neglects to mention that certain aspects of battery performance can be bracketed already. The fundamental principles of physical chemistry apply to the entire Periodic Table, enabling us to predict the most energetic reactions and atomic weights. Though simulating an ideal mixture of chemicals using a quantum computer is valuable, impurities in real-world devices pose a challenge.

Kaku also overlooks the fact that technological advancements tend to uplift all aspects of the field. Progress in renewable energy technology could simultaneously drive down fossil energy costs, especially if externalizes remain unaccounted for. Moreover, human history demonstrates that new energy sources typically augment, rather than replace, existing ones. For instance, wood remains a prominent energy source despite the availability of advanced alternatives. The crux of the energy challenge lies in human psychology: fostering a desire to limit energy consumption and prioritize sustainability.

Quantum computing might revolutionize various domains, but its potential to transform behavioral aspects should not be underestimated. The intricate web of challenges necessitates a multidimensional approach that addresses both technological innovation and human values.

Brief Summary Book Of Quantum Supremacy: How the Quantum Computer Revolution Will Change Everything by Michio Kaku The soaring triumph of the microchip processor might be approaching its limits. As we encounter the confines imposed by diminishing sizes, conventional silicon chips are unlikely to offer solutions to the monumental challenges confronting humanity—from battling climate change…